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7 Ways Your Body Benefits from Lemon Water

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Overview

Lemon water is all the rage these days.

Many restaurants serve it routinely, and some people start their day with lemon water instead of coffee or tea. There’s no doubt lemons are delicious, but does adding them to water make you healthier?

Much of the evidence supporting lemon water’s health benefits is anecdotal.

Little scientific research has been done specifically on lemon water’s impact on health as a whole, but some research exists on the benefits of lemon and water separately.

Here are seven ways your body may benefit from lemon water.

1. It promotes hydration

According to the Food and Nutrition Board, the dietary reference intake for water is 91 to 125 ounces. This includes water from food and drinks.

Water is the best beverage for hydration, but some people don’t like the taste of it on its own. Adding lemon enhances water’s flavor, which may help you drink more.

2. It’s a good source of vitamin C

Citrus fruits like lemons are high in vitamin C, which is a primary antioxidant that helps protect cells from damaging free radicals.

Vitamin C may reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, and lower blood pressure. Research published in Stroke showed that people with low vitamin C levels, especially obese men with high blood pressure, have a higher risk of stroke.

Vitamin C may also help prevent or limit the duration of the common cold in some people, although studies are conflicting.

While lemons don’t top the list of citrus fruits high in vitamin C, they’re still a good source. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, 1/4 cup raw lemon juice provides about 23.6 grams of vitamin C. That’s over 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA).

Vitamin C found in lemons may help reduce skin wrinkling. A study published in the American Society for Clinical Nutrition concluded that people who consumed more vitamin C have less risk of wrinkled and dry skin.

How water improves skin is controversial, but one thing is certain. If your skin loses moisture, it becomes dry and wrinkle-prone.

Whether it’s better to apply moisturizer to the skin or drink more water isn’t clear, but UW Health recommends drinking at least eight glasses of water daily to stay hydrated and rid the skin of toxins.

4. It supports weight loss

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition showed that polyphenol antioxidants found in lemons significantly reduced weight gain caused by a high-fat diet in mice. In addition, insulin resistance was improved.

While the same results need to be proven in humans, anecdotal evidence is strong that lemon water supports weight loss. Whether this is due to an increase in water intake and fullness or the lemons remains to be seen.

Some people drink lemon water as a daily morning laxative to help prevent constipation. Drinking warm or hot lemon water when you wake up may help get your digestive systemmoving.

Ayurvedic medicine believes the sour lemon taste helps stimulate your “agni.” In Ayurveda, a strong agni jump-starts the digestive system, allowing you to digest food easily and helping prevent the buildup of toxins.

Have you ever rubbed a lemon on your hands to remove a powerful stench? It’s thought to neutralize odors. The same folk remedy may apply to bad breath caused by eating foods with strong smells like garlic, onions, or fish.

Keep your breath sweeter by drinking a glass of lemon water after meals and first thing in the morning. Lemon is thought to stimulate saliva, and water helps prevent a dry mouth, which leads to bad breath caused by excess bacteria growth.

7. It helps prevent kidney stones

The citric acid in lemons may help prevent calcium kidney stonesUW Health recommends increasing citric acid intake to decrease your risk of getting new calcium stones. Drinking lemon water not only helps you get more citric acid, but also the water you need to prevent stones.

Having 1/2 cup of lemon juice provides the same amount of citric acid you’d find in prescription varieties.

How to make lemon water

In order to reap any health benefits of lemon water, you need to drink it consistently, and you need more than just a single wedge of lemon in your mug.

When making lemon water, always use fresh lemons and not artificial lemon from a bottle. To make lemon water, squeeze half a lemon into 8 ounces of boiling, warm, or cold water. To make the drink as healthy as possible, use filtered water and organic lemons.

Infuse flavor to lemon water by adding:

You can also add slices of other fresh citrus fruits such as limes and oranges, or cucumber slices.

Having lemon ice cubes on hand is a great way to add lemon to your water fast. Simply squeeze fresh lemon juice into ice cube trays and freeze. Drop a few cubes into a glass of cold or hot water as needed.

Start your morning with a mug of warm lemon water, and keep a pitcher of water infused with a few sliced, whole lemons in your refrigerator to drink throughout the day.

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Health

Red Meat Hurts Your Heart, Right? Scientists Find That May Not Be True

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  • A new study finds that eating red meat isn’t associated with an increased risk of cancer or heart disease.
  • This goes against long-held scientific opinion that red meat is associated with an increased risk of certain health conditions.
  • But experts say this doesn’t mean you can eat burgers every day, and that more research needs to be done.

We’ve heard it for years: Cut back on red meat in favor of lean meats like fish or chicken. But now researchers say there’s evidence red meat may not be quite as bad for our health as we’ve thought.

A rigorous review of the evidence finds little to no health benefit from reducing red or processed meat consumption from average levels. But don’t think this means you can go and have a burger every day.

The findings were published trusted Source today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Via HealthLine.com

 

 

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Health

Why Cancer in Younger Adults Is Increasing So Dramatically

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Certain cancers are showing up more often in younger adults. Researchers believe obesity is to blame.

A comprehensive study published this week found that 6 out of 12 types of cancer thought to result from being significantly overweight are becoming notably more common among those under the age of 50.

What’s more, the younger the patient, the more common certain cancers were.

The findings, published in The Lancet Public Health, noted a significant increase in the incidence of multiple myeloma — rare cancer that attacks the bone marrow — along with colorectal, uterine, gallbladder, kidney, and pancreatic cancer.

Obesity has also been linked to cancer of the stomach, liver, breasts, ovaries, esophagus, and thyroid.

The study’s authors said their work is the first since the mid-1990s to review trends in the incidence of these 12 obesity-related cancers. They compared them with 18 other cancers among younger adults.

The team reviewed 20 years of data on those cancers, studying information from state registries on patients ranging in age from 25 to 84.

They found more than 14 million cases diagnosed from 1995 through 2014 for the 30 types of cancer.

“What makes this study relevant is that it’s very large,” said Dr. Anton Bilchik, a professor of surgery and chief of medicine at the John Wayne Cancer Institute in California.

That obesity-related cancers are showing up in relatively young people has been the subject of multiple studies in recent years.

What’s striking about this latest research, Bilchik told Healthline, is both its scope and the discovery that the incidence of some of these diseases is rising among successively younger groups.

By contrast, rates either dropped or held steady in all­­ but 2 of the 18 cancers not related to obesity.

Bilchik is seeing the trend among his own patients.

In the past week, Bilchik operated on four individuals under 55 with diagnoses of advanced-stage cancers that usually affect people in their 60s and 70s.

Two of them were obese and the other two had been overweight as children, which Bilchik thinks also predisposed them to cancer.

One example of the inverse relationship between risk and age is pancreatic cancer.

The study’s authors found the incidence of that disease changed .77 percent per year on average in the 45- to 49-year age group.

By contrast, the annual incidence rose by 2.47 percent on average among 30- to 34-year-olds. In the 25- to 29-year-old cohort, the average yearly change was 4.34 percent.

Although adults ages 50 and older also experienced steady increases in the incidence of most of those obesity-related cancers — colorectal and uterine were the exceptions — the magnitude of those changes was smaller than among younger age groups, except for thyroid cancer.

What’s the connection?

The connection between obesity and certain cancers remains unclear, as does the reason for the uptick of those illnesses in ever-younger populations.

However, medical experts have some theories.

Experiments on mice have shown that obesity accelerates the uncontrolled growth of cells, which could result in human malignancies being discovered earlier in life, the recent study reported.

Obesity has been an increasingly worrisome problem for decades now.

An estimated 40 percent of adults and 18 percent of young people in the United States are obese, despite national guidelines that recommend doctors screen children and young adults for obesity.

The recent study noted that fewer than half of primary care physicians routinely calculate their patients’ body mass index and only one-third of people with obesity report that their doctor determined they were substantially overweight or referred them to weight loss counseling.

But there are other aspects of the problem as well.

Genes, metabolism, and exposure to environmental factors such as processed foods might also play a role in obesity, said Dr. George Chang, professor of surgery and chief of colorectal surgery at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

“It’s certainly a very complex issue and that’s why it’s such a difficult public health problem,” Chang told Healthline.

What are the solutions?

Finding a solution will require the efforts of all stakeholders, Chang said.

“I think everybody’s responsible,” he said.

Individuals need to understand the consequences of poor lifestyle choices and healthcare providers should be impressing the importance of proper diet and exercise with their patients even though it can be a sensitive topic for those who are overweight, Chang said.

Policy makers also have a role to play. One way could be limiting students’ access to food and sugary drinks that contribute to childhood obesity, Chang said.

The study noted that although some communities are taxing sodas and creating pedestrian-friendly areas to boost physical activity, they remain the exception.

Other factors

Obesity itself isn’t necessarily the only culprit in a younger person’s cancer diagnosis, however.

Other health complications that excess weight can cause — such as diabetes and gallstones — are also associated with cancer, according to the report.

So is a diet that’s top-heavy with red or processed meat but short on fruits and vegetables.

Whatever the cause, the study concluded that the growing problem of obesity-related cancers in younger generations ultimately could stop or even reverse the progress that’s been made in reducing cancer deaths.

The bottom lineA new study says cancers related to obesity are on the rise among younger adults.

In particular, there has been a significant increase in multiple myeloma, colorectal, uterine, gallbladder, kidney, and pancreatic cancers.

In addition, the younger the age group the higher the increase was.

Researchers said doctors need to emphasize healthy eating choices as well as exercise routines to younger people.

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Health

Drinking soda linked to higher risk of kidney disease, finds new study

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New United States research has found that a high intake of sugar sweetened beverages such as sweetened fruit drinks and soda may be linked to an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Carried out by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, the new study looked at 3,003 African-American men and women with normal kidney function who were enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study, a long-term study investigating risk factors for diseases such as high blood pressure, heart disease, strokes, and diabetes.

The researchers assessed beverage intake using a food frequency questionnaire completed at the start of the study from 2000 to 2004, and then followed participants until 2009 to 2013.

The findings, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), showed that consuming a “beverage pattern” of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing CKD.

Although certain beverages, such as sugar-sweetened drinks, have already been found to affect kidney health, previous findings have been inconsistent. The new study also contributes to the growing body of evidence of the negative health consequences of drinking sugar-sweetened beverages.

However, the researchers were surprised to find that water was one of the drinks also linked with a higher risk of CKD. They noted that the participants’ water consumption may have included a wide variety of types of water, including flavored and sweetened water, although unfortunately, the researchers did not collect information about specific brands or types of bottled water in the Jackson Heart Study. JB

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